WorldWalk.info
ru ru en en de de  
Health Resorts, Hotels
Health Resorts, Hotels
Museums, Exhibitions
Museums, Exhibitions
Dolphinariums, Water Parks
Dolphinariums, Water Parks
Nature
Nature
Architecture, Monuments
Architecture, Monuments
Holy Places
Holy Places
Parks, Amusement Parks
Parks, Amusement Parks
Theatres, Cinemas
Theatres, Cinemas

Zhovten Cinema, Oktyabr Cinema (Kiev)

26 Konstantinovskaya Street, Kiev (tel.: +38 044 417-27-02, +38 044 205-59-51, +38 044 417-30-04), Metro station: "Kontraktovaya Square".

Map

http://www.zhovten-kino.kiev.ua

The Zhovten Cinema (also known as the Oktyabr Cinema; the Cinema, for short) was the first Kiev cinema constructed after the 1917 Russian Revolution. The Cinema was open on 8 November 1930 as the Ninth Goskino Cinema.

Its practice of regular shows was solemnly opened on 29 January 1931 with the premiere of the film Hegemon directed by Nikolay Shpikovsky.

The newspaper Proletarskaya Pravda responded in its issue of 30 January 1931 to the opening of the Cinema with an article called "A Victory on the Cultural Front", which expressed a hope that the new cinema would become not merely a cinema, but also "a laboratory of the proletarian culture".

As was characteristic of a Soviet cinema of that time, besides cinema shows spectators were also offered a reading room, a library and such games as chess, checkers, and domino. And, as the article noted, the Cinema's shooting room "offers an opportunity to use a shotgun for a detailed study of rifles as well as to get introduced to military camouflage and to the theory of shooting". All this was very important for the proletariat, which at the time was preparing for a world revolution. Thus, the Cinema performed a very important (for the time) function, namely, that of "an organiser of the proletariat's will for building socialism".

The Cinema was constructed on the former site of an estate that has belonged to the well-known Kiev businessman Yakov Kapler, the father of the famous Soviet dramatist Aleksey Kapler who wrote screenplays for such films as Lenin in October (1937), She Protects Her Motherland (1943), I Accept Battle (1966) and others.

The first architectural design of the Cinema was proposed by the architect Noy Trotsky in 1928. However, the construction works were carried out in accordance with a different design, one by Valerian Rykov. This architect is also known by the building of the Hospital of the Society of the Red-Cross Wailer Sisters (later, the Strazhesko Clinical Institute), by the "cinema factory" (later, the Dovzhenko Film Studios) and by others.

The construction of the Cinema cost 312,600 roubles. The building's volume being 10,217 cubic metres (13,363 cubic yards), it seated 680 people. There were also 5 lobbies in the cinema, their total area being 408 square metres (4,390 square feet).

Later on, the Cinema was rebuilt many times. The redesigns concerned its facade as well as its technical equipment.

In 1945–1952, furniture was replaced, the lobbies were re-equipped, and a new practice (for the time), that of group ticket booking, was introduced.

In 1955, the Cinema's grand auditorium became Ukraine's first auditorium equipped for wide-screen films.

In 1960, an additional auditorium, which seated 300 people, was constructed, while special film projectors were installed in the lobbies; these projectors allowed showing various reels such as newsreels under any lighting conditions.

In 1990, major repairs were completed, rooms were re-equipped, furniture was replaced, and the best (for the time) equipment was installed.

It is interesting to note that the Cinema functioned even during the Second World War; however, when Kiev was liberated from the Nazi troops, the Cinema was half-destroyed, having no equipment, furniture or decorative design.

After the Cinema had been redesigned, it received its current name, the Zovten Cinema, zovten being Ukrainian for "October"; however, even in Kiev it is still usual to call the cinema by its original Russian name, the Oktyabr Cinema, oktyabr being Russian for "October".

Today, the Zhovten Cinema has 5 auditoriums:
– the Hegemon Auditorium that seats 400 people and is equipped with a Dolby Digital system of panoramic sound, with a JBL audio equipment and with a pearlescent screen (13.6 by 5.7 metres or 44.6 by 18.7 feet) as well as with soft, velvet chairs and VIP sofas for two;
– the Kinoman Auditorium that seats 175 people and is equipped with a Dolby Digital system of panoramic sound, a KCL audio equipment and with a pearlescent screen (9 by 3.8 metres or 29.5 by 12.5 feet). A distinctive feature of this auditorium is very soft chairs, filled with a special material, that take the shapes of those who sit on them. This auditorium also has the VIP sofas for two.
– the Anshlag Auditorium that seats 70 (opened in January 2006). This auditorium is equipped with a Dolby Digital system of panoramic sound, with a pearlescent screen (4.5 meters by 2 meters or 14.8 feet by 6.5 feet) and with a SANYO PLV-80 multimedia projector.
– the Klassik Auditorium that seats 50 (opened on 12 February 2008) and is equipped with a Doubly Digital system of panoramic sound, a white-matte and perforated screen (3.9 metres by 2.2 metres or 12.8 feet by 7.2 feet) and a SANYO PLV-80 multimedia projector. All the chairs have a mechanical recliner mechanism.
– the Sladkaya Zhizn ("Dolce Vita") Auditorium (opened in November 2008). Eleven sofas with small tables, i.e., 22 seats. This auditorium is equipped with a Dolby Digital system of panoramic sound, a Multivision pearlescent screen (4.2 meters by 2.7 meters or 14.8 feet by 8.9 feet) and a SANYO PLC-WXU 30 multimedia projector.

Spectators may wait for their shows in a bar-cafeteria or in the Oktyabr "cinema cafe", the latter having a special interior design, in the style of the early 20th century cinema.

Image Gallery Image Preview (8)

Zhovten Cinema, Oktyabr Cinema



info@worldwalk.infoinfo@worldwalk.info